mercoledì 16 settembre 2015



Invecchiare in Canada è un buon affare: nell'elenco  Global Age Watch index (HelpAge International) dei 96 Paesi del mondo dove la vecchiaia è tutelata nel modo migliore (sanità, servizi, ambiente, etc.) il Canada è al quinto posto, dopo Svizzera, Norvegia, Svezia e Germania. Solo dopo questo eccellente quintetto troviamo in ordine sparso Usa, Regno Unito, Olanda, Islanda, Giappone, ed altre nazioni  che

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e’re in a good place. Not the best, but close.
Canada ranks fifth as the best place to grow old, with Switzerland topping the list followed by Norway, Sweden and Germany.
We’re ahead of the Netherlands, Iceland and Japan.
The U.S. ranks ninth followed by the United Kingdom.
The Global Age Watch index was compiled by HelpAge International, which determines the best and worst countries for older people taking into account income status, health status, enabling environment, education and employment.
Canada got the highest score for health, at number four worldwide.
Canada also ranks high in the enabling environment domain despite older people reporting low satisfaction with public transport (56 per cent).
Satisfaction with civic freedom (93 per cent) and social connectedness (94 per cent) are among the highest in the region.
The country also ranks high in income security with 97.7 per cent pension income coverage and a poverty rate (6.8 per cent) below the regional average.
We also scored well with the employment rate (60.5 per cent) and educational attainment among older people (84.5 per cent) above regional averages.
According to the report:
– There are 8 million Canadians over the age of 60.
– In 2014, people over 60 made up 22.3 per cent of the population. This will increase to 29.4 per cent in 2030 and 32.5 per cent in 2050.
– A 60-year old Canadian can expect to live 25 more years.
– A 60-year old Canadian can expect to live in good health for an average of 18.3 years.

Global AgeWatch Index 2015

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